First Studies of Plant Life for Printing and Binding

This is 5 PDF files that together contain the book First Studies of Plant Life by George Francis Atkinson. The book is split into five files due to size limitations.

First Studies of Plant Life in 18 signatures of 4 pages for binding. (1 of 5) contains 4 signatures

First Studies of Plant Life in 18 signatures of 4 pages for binding. (2 of 5) contains 4 signatures

First Studies of Plant Life in 18 signatures of 4 pages for binding. (3 of 5) contains 4 signatures

First Studies of Plant Life in 18 signatures of 4 pages for binding. (4 of 5) contains 3 signatures

First Studies of Plant Life in 18 signatures of 4 pages for binding. (5 of 5) contains 3 signatures

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

This book was created from scanned PDFs, rather than new formatting from plain text, so the quality is not as crisp as with my re-formatted books.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 18 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 4 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 72 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 288 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations and photos. It also includes a single colour picture, of the original cover, on the second page.

To make the pages come out evenly, I removed 2 pages of advertising for other books that were included in the original book. I did leave 2 additional pages of advertisements for other books.

This is a book about the science of plants. It includes five sections: the growth and parts of plants; the work of plants; the behaviour of plants; life stories of plants; and battles of plants in the world.

First Studies of Plant Life is used as a science selection starting in year 7 of AmblesideOnline, the free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum.

You can find the original text of First Studies of Plant Life by George Francis Atkinson at Internet Archive.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

Paper Sloyd for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book Paper Sloyd: A Handbook for Primary Grades by Ednah Anne Rich.

Paper Sloyd for Children in 5 signatures of 4 pages for binding.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

This book was created from scanned PDFs, rather than new formatting from plain text, so the quality is not as crisp as with my re-formatted books.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 5 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 4 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 20 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 80 pages.

The original book was a horizontal book with a binding on the short edge. In order to print it on regular 8 1/2 X 11 paper, I changed the formatting so it opens like a traditional book along the long edge. You will need to read it sideways, flipping the book pages up, rather than to the left.

This version contains black and white illustrations and diagrams.

This book teaches the art of folding paper, called paper sloyd. Sloyd is a technique of teaching handicraft skills. I first heard about paper sloyd and this book at a Charlotte Mason education conference where Wendi Capehart of the AmblesideOnline Advisory demonstrated a lesson.

You might be interested in reading more about paper sloyd in a Charlotte Mason education at The Charlotte Mason Institute and at Simply Charlotte Mason.

You can find the original text of Paper Sloyd by Ednah Anne Rich at the Internet Archive.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

 

 

Viking Tales for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book Viking Tales by Jennie Hall.

Viking Tales in 14 signatures of 4 pages.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 14 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 4 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 56 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 224 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations.

This books tells the tale of the Viking Harald and how he becomes King of Norway.

The first half of Viking Tales is used as a history selection in year 1 of the AmblesideOnline free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum.

You can find the original text of Viking Tales by Jennie Hall at Project Gutenberg.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

Understood Betsy for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher.

Understood Betsy in 15 signatures of 5 pages for binding.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 15 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 5 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 75 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 300 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations. It also contains one colour picture on the 5th page.

Understood Betsy is a delightful story about an overprotected little girl who goes unexpectedly to live with cousins in the country. Their different style and expectations help her to learn to be more self sufficient and confident in her own abilities.

Understood Betsy is used as a literature selection in year 2 of the AmblesideOnline free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum.

You can find the original text of Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher at Project Gutenberg.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

The Little Duke for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book The Little Duke by Charlotte Yonge.

The Little Duke in 11 signatures of 6 pages.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 11 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 6 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 66 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 264 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations.

This is a wonderful history book about Richard, Duke of Normandy. He was an ancestor of the famous William the Conqueror. It is challenging book for children, and one that can take some time to get into. But there is lots of action and excitement to keep children interested.

The Little Duke is used as a history selection in year 2 of the AmblesideOnline free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum. The curriculum suggests reading half a chapter per week, so I added a row of stars (*******) about half way through each chapter to help keep track of a suitable stopping place.

You can find the original text of The Little Duke by Charlotte Yonge at Project Gutenberg.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

Great Astronomers for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book Great Astronomers by Robert Ball.

Great Astronomers in 18 signatures of 6 pages.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 18 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 6 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 108 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 432 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations.

This book contains 18 biographies of different scientists, from Ptolemy to John Couch Adams, including Copernicus, Galileo, Newton and William Herschel.

Great Astronomers is used as a science selection starting in year 7 of AmblesideOnline, the free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum.

You can find the original text of Great Astronomers by Robert Ball at Project Gutenberg.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

Long’s Home Geography for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of the book Geography for Primary Grades by C.C. Long.

Long’s Geography for Primary Grades in 12 signatures of 4 pages. 

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 12 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 4 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 48 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 192 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations.

This books explains a variety of geography ideas in a simple and old fashioned way that children can understand. It focuses on asking questions and observing the world.

Geography for Primary Grades by C.C. Long is suggested for use in years 1 to 6 of the AmblesideOnline free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum. At the end of the book I have included a list of the chapters recommended for use by AmblesideOnline in each year.

Someone on the AmblesideOnline Facebook group asked about how to use this book to teach geography concepts in a Charlotte Mason homeschool. My response was: “There are certain geography concepts to learn each year. In year 6, in term 1 we are supposed to teach about animal features and their purpose and how we use animals. Chapters 37, 38 and 39 of Long’s Geography cover these subjects. You do not have to use this book, but we have found it easiest for us. We read the suggested chapters spread over the term. (I fit them in when we have time, as the chapters aren’t scheduled in the [AmblesideOnline] 36-week schedule) We read the questions [in the end of many of the chapters of Long’s Geography] and sometimes discuss them, but don’t work through the answers or write them down. But feel free to if you want. I personally haven’t felt it necessary.
Then as you go about life, and on nature walks, focus on the concepts that were covered. So in the case of year 6, term 1 you might (and this is totally off the top of my head!) talk about meat at the butcher, leather when you polish your shoes, honey? Maybe find a book about animal tracks at the library or something about horns and antlers? Not a big huge thing. Don’t make it into a project. Just point out things related to the subject over the term when they come up. And have your child look for them too (especially a year 6 child!)
It isn’t really complicated. Read, narrate, notice/focus/point out. That’s it!”

You can find the original text of Home Geography for Primary Grades by C. C. Long at Project Gutenberg.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

(Some of) Fifty Famous Stories Retold for Printing and Binding

This is a PDF file of 30 selected stories from the book Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin.

From Fifty Famous Stories Retold in 11 signatures of 4 pages.

To bind your own copy of this book, please follow the directions starting with printing your book.

IMPORTANT: You must print “short-edge binding” on both sides of the page for the pages to be oriented correctly.

I have formatted it to print and bind to make your own hardcover copy of this book. Your book will consist of 11 signatures, or booklets, each of which will use 4 sheets of paper. To print this book you will print 44 sheets of paper, double sided. Your final book will have 176 pages.

This version contains black and white illustrations.

I have used a large font to make it easier for young children to follow along and perhaps read on their own. I have retained the dashes between the syllables of longer words and other grammatical marks designed to make them easier for young readers to decode.

These stories from Fifty Famous Stories Retold were selected by the advisory team for use as a history selection in year 1 of the AmblesideOnline free Charlotte Mason homeschool curriculum. The stories have been placed in chronological order, rather than in Mr. Baldwin’s original order. Also, the story of William Tell in Mr. Baldwin’s book has been replaced by a version of the story by Horace Scudder from The Book of Legends, as suggested by the advisory. To quote the AmblesideOnline Advisory, “The selected Tales from ‘Fifty Famous Stories Retold’ are historically vital for cultural literacy. No child should grow up without knowing the story of William Tell or Horatio at the Bridge. These tales not only have deep value as stories of courage, bravery, and wit, but they will also show up in many other readings (and in media sources as well) for the rest of your child’s life.”

My PDF file does not contain the full book as originally published.

You can find the original text of Fifty Famous Stories Retold by James Baldwin at Project Gutenberg.

You can find the original text of The Book of Legends by Horace Scudder at the Internet Archive.

Please let me know if you find any errors so I can correct them for others.

Please consider looking at other books I have formatted for binding.

I hope you enjoy your book! Happy reading!

 

Making Your Book Cover (Case Binding)

The final step is making your own book is turning your text block into a hard cover book by making the cover and attaching it to your book.

I follow the directions from Sea Lemon, in her hard cover case binding tutorial.

Materials:

If your signature pages are made from standard 8 ½ by 11” paper, you will need fabric or paper about 14” wide, and 11” high. The thicker the book, the wider the cloth. The height will always be 11”.

In her video, Sea Lemon uses book cloth. This is fabric that is fused to tissue paper. I believe the fussing interface makes the fabric just a little stiffer and the tissue paper is to eliminate the stickiness. Sea Lemon describes making book cloth in another video. I found making book cloth easy but does cost the price of the fusible interfacing. The results are beautiful. I plan to try making a book with only standard fabric at the next opportunity to see the difference.

I have also used scrapbook paper for the cover.  Although scrapbook paper works for a cover, but you will need to glue sheets of paper together together a big enough piece. I think it looks nice to use a strip of paper in a contrasting colour for the spine glued to other decorative paper.

My husband has suggested that as the cover is a hinge, a paper cover may not last as long as a cloth cover. I am new enough to book binding that I can’t accurately asses this yet!

  • PVA glue. (My regular Elmer’s glue appears to be a type of PVA glue, and that is what I have been using.)

 Tools:

  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Cutting mat (This is helpful when you are cutting your cardboard, but not necessary. Just protect your table!)
  • Bone folder (very useful and inexpensive. Sea Lemon has a video to suggest alternatives if you don’t want to buy one.)
  • Utility blade
  • Scissors (or cutting blade)
  • Glue brush (an old paint brush for the glue works well.)
  • Weights (I used heavy books)
  • Book press. (Sea Lemon shows how to make a book press. It was cheap and easy to do and makes creating the book much easier. I highly recommend it. I bought two identical cutting boards and some stick on rubber feet at the dollar store and the carriage bolts and butterfly screws loose at the hardware store. Sea Lemon’s version only uses 2 bolts. I made mine with 4 because I think it makes it press more evenly. The book press can also be used as a flower press!)
  • Drafting triangle (optional – I have never used one, but it would help ensure everything stays square.)

Directions:

These are not full directions, only my tips and pointers based on my own experience following following Sea Lemon’s video to make several books. Please watch Sea Lemon’s full directions for making a hard cover book case binding on YouTube.

Cut Book Boards

The first step is cutting the board for the covers and the spine. Cereal box cardboard has worked well for me, but you can see Sea Lemon’s suggestions for finding book board in a video she made.

The cover boards are the width of the text block minus ¼” plus 1/8″. If you are using 8 ½ X 11 paper folded in half, that means you need a cover board that is 5 3/8″ wide. The height of the cover board is the height of the text block plus 1/4″ which for 8 ½ X 11 paper folded in half is 8 ¾” high. So I cut my 2 cover boards to 5 3/8″ by 8 ¾”.

The spine piece varies from book to book in width. It is the actual width of your text block, and the same height as you cover board (8 ¾” high).

Carefully measure and cut your cardboard.
Choose cardboard for you cover. I use old cereal boxes.
The two cover boards and the spine board ready for the next step.

Make Book Cover

Glue the boards to the cover material (paper or cloth). Don’t forget to leave ¼” of space between the cover pieces and the spine piece on either side. Make sure if there is any pattern that you are getting it lined up in the way you want!

If you are using paper, make sure that it is sturdy paper. As you need a piece about 11″ X 14″, you can cut a 12″ by 12″ piece of paper in half, then add a strip of paper in a contrasting colour to make the piece at the spine. For extra strength, you may want to have two thickness of paper glued together at the spine for added strength.

A contrasting piece of paper at the spine to cover my book.
I am overlapping the paper when I glue it together to make the finished book stronger.

When Sea Lemon glues her boards to her cover fabric, she starts with one of the cover boards. If you are using a special different coloured strip of paper for the spine, you will want to begin by gluing the spine board in the centre, then measuring out ¼” on either side before gluing on your front and back cover boards.This will ensure that the coloured strip in centered on your finished book.

Glue on the spine piece first and measure out 1/4″ if you have a clear middle that want to use.

Let the cover dry well before folding and gluing the flaps to finish off the cover.

After the board is glued to the fabric or decorative paper, it needs to dry under something heavy to keep it flat.
When it is dry, trim the corners.
Fold the flaps.
Glue down the flaps.
And your cover is done!

Attach Text Block to Book Cover

The last step is attaching the text block you made earlier to the book cover. This is done by gluing the cover pages to the inside of the cover boards. Notice that Sea Lemon glues the front and the back, but she does NOT glue the spine. The spine should not be glued to the text block for the finished book to open and close properly.

Spread your glue over the book cover and attach the text block.
Smooth it all down nicely with your bone folder.

When I glued together my first book together, there was some wrinkling in the text block after I attached the cover and left it to dry. To avoid this in my subsequent books, I put a piece of wax paper between the glued paper and the text block at the front and back to prevent the moisture from entering the text block as the glue dried. I also put a piece of regular paper right inside the cover between the two sides of the end paper to absorb the moisture from the glue. This has prevented any more wrinkly books.

The wax paper goes after the end page, between the cover and the book and the scrap paper goes farther towards the outside, between the two sides of the pretty end paper.

Let Your Book Dry.

Let it dry well in the book press, and you are done! Read, admire and show off your new book!

I have found that I can easily make a book in two days, with plenty of time to dry between steps when I am free to do other things.

Steps to Binding Your Own Book:

Step 1: Prepare or Select Text

Step 2: Print your Text

Step 3: Sew your Text Block

Step 4: Make and Attach the Cover (You are here!)

Sewing Your Book (Creating a Text Block)

After you have printed the text of your book, things get exciting. It is time to bind your book.

I follow the directions from Sea Lemon, in her text block case binding tutorial. Sea Lemon uses blank pages in her books, and I have found that there are a few things that matter more when you are using a printed book rather than a blank book. I have included tips and tricks from my experience binding books, but my instructions here are incomplete without watching her video.

Materials:

  • Printed book pages (Sea Lemon uses blank pages)
  • 1 sheet 5” X 8” paper (just an extra piece of paper. It can be scrap as you won’t see it in your final book. Alternatively, or additionally, some cheesecloth.)
  • 2 thick sheets of 8 1/2” X 11” paper. (Use something decorative to go with your cover. These are the sheets that make up the inside of your cover. Scrapbook paper works well.)
  • Thread (Sea Lemon suggests waxed in the video but in later videos she says any thread works. I use nylon upholstery thread.)
  • Ribbon (Sea Lemon adds a ribbon bookmark. I haven’t bothered, but go for it!)
  • PVA glue. (My regular Elmer’s glue appears to be a type of PVA glue, and that is what I have been using.)

Tools: (as suggested by Sea Lemon)

  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Cutting mat. (I haven’t needed the cutting mat, but I do put my signatures on top of the cutting boards used to make my book press when I am using the awl. Otherwise you will make little holes in your work surface.)
  • Bone folder (very useful and inexpensive. Sea Lemon has a video to suggest alternatives if you don’t want to buy one.)
  • Awl (We had an awl in the garage. It came with our screwdriver set.) Sea Lemon has some suggestions for alternatives to using an awl.
  • Needle (For the needle, I really like the curved needle. I had one sitting in my sewing box.) You can see what Sea Lemon has to say about needles for bookbinding here.
  • Glue brush (an old paint brush for the glue works well.)
  • Sandpaper (I haven’t needed the sandpaper – it is intended to smooth your pages if you decide to trim them.)
  • Utility blade and scissors. (I used the utility blade to trim my first book as Sea Lemon suggests in her video, but haven’t done it since. I think it looks better without the trimming, and saves time!)
  • Book press. (Sea Lemon shows how to make a book press. It was cheap and easy to do and makes creating the book much easier. I highly recommend it. I bought two identical cutting boards and some stick on rubber feet at the dollar store and the carriage bolts and butterfly screws loose at the hardware store. Sea Lemon’s version only uses 2 bolts. I made mine with 4 because I think it makes it press more evenly. The book press can also be used as a flower press!)

Directions:

Again, please watch the Sea Lemon video for full directions.

Fold & Create Signatures

Your book is made up of several signatures, or booklets,sewn together. Each signature consists of several pieces of paper nested inside each other. Sea Lemon uses signatures of 4 pieces of paper, which would make 8 pages of a book (16 if you count them front and back!). I have made books with between 3 and six pieces of paper per signature.

In the video you will see Sea Lemon carefully fold each of her sheets of paper individually and press down the folds with a bone folder. Do this carefully, making sure to fold your pages in the correct direction. Remember that the page numbers are a little difficult to follow as the booklet pages are all out of order! The flow of the page numbers should be from smallest to largest, and when the sheets in a single signature (booklet) are all fitted together, the pages should run in the correct order without skipping any pages or having any pages out of order. Take your time and make sure your book pages are in the correct order and that each signature is complete. This is probably the hardest part of making your book!

Fold by hand first.
Smooth your folds with the bone folder.
Combine your signatures (or booklets).
The hardest part is done!

Mark & Make Holes

I mark 7 holes 1“ apart, with 1 ¼ inches at the top and bottom. This divides nicely on a 8 ½“ high spine when using 8.5 X 11 printer paper.

Make sure your book is piled up in the correct order, with your front page at the top, and your last page of the last signature on the bottom before marking the holes. Keeping them in order helps keep your book square.

Transfer the marks from the first signature to the rest, and make the holes in each signature using an awl as shown in the video.

Measure for your binding holes, 1″ apart, with 1 1/4″ at the top and bottom.
With the signatures stacked in order, carefully transfer your marks.
Use your awl to make holes through the paper. Do all the pages of a signature at once, but do only one signature at a time.
All the signatures have their holes!

Sew the Binding

Notice that Sea Lemon starts sewing the LAST SIGNATURE FIRST. She doesn’t make a huge fuss about this, because it isn’t a huge deal with blank book, but it is of critical importance for a printed book! When sewing the book, you start with the last signature of the book and add the next ones, ending by sewing on the first signature.

Start with the last signature first. The very last page of the book is facing down. The first page of the last signature is facing up.

The stitching can seem intimidating, especially if you aren’t a sewer. But it is not as hard as it might look at first. If you don’t find her explanation of the sewing clear enough, Sea Lemon did another video later that goes over the kettle stitch again, using black thread so you can more clearly see what she is doing. Sit in front of the computer with your book and needle in your hand and pause as needed! That’s what I did with my first book.

Make sure that the threads are pulled through for each stitch. You don’t want loose stitches.

Also, it is easy to add more thread when you need to, so don’t worry about having enough to sew the entire book together.

Through the holes…
Under the thread…
And back into the hole…
Later, go around the previous stitches…
to hold the suignautres together.
All sewn up!

Glue the Binding

I made a book press as Sea Lemon suggests. It was cheap and easy to do and I think it is one of those cases where the right tools make the job easier. I’m sure you could get away with using heavy books on top if you want.

Into the book press.
Applying the glue.

Sea Lemon adds a bookmark ribbon here too. I haven’t done this yet, but I plan to do it on the next book I print for my daughter. She loves books with ribbon bookmarks.

Apply End Page & Extra Paper on Spine

The end pages are the paper that will glue your text block to your cover, so choose strong paper. I use scrapbook paper. Also, make sure you like the appearance of the paper and that it looks nice with the materials you plan to use for your cover. If you paper for your end pages has a pattern on only one side, fold the pattern inwards, not outwards. The outside will eventually be glued onto you hard cover and will not be seen. The inside is what will show on your finished book.

Pretty side in!

After the end pages have been applied and dried, Sea Lemon adds a piece of paper along the spine to give it strength. My mother, a librarian, suggested adding something like cheese cloth instead of the paper on the spine to make a stronger, longer lasting book. I haven’t tried that yet, but it seems like it would be a good idea.

Trimming the Pages

Sea Lemon finishes by trimming the pages of her book to make them even. I tried trimming the first book I made, and I wasn’t very happy with the results the first time. I found it very, very difficult to make it look perfect. I tried again with a sharper utility blade, and the results were better, but with my subsequent books, I left them un-trimmed and I think they look lovely the way they are.

When you have completed the steps in this video, you could stop and have something you could use as a book… but a few more steps to add the hard cover creates a beautiful book that should last a very long time, and look lovely on your bookshelf.

Steps to Binding Your Own Book:

Step 1: Prepare or Select Text

Step 2: Print your Text

Step 3: Sew your Text Block (You are here!)

Step 4: Make and Attach the Cover